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Ashland tops Troy in second meeting between Fralick father and son

Basketball   | Jeff Dullack

Ashland tops Troy in second meeting between Fralick father and son

Harper Woods – Last season, it was the father getting the best of his son.

This time around, it was the son coming out on top.

For the second straight year, Troy coach Gary Fralick coached against his son Tim, the sideline general of Ashland (OH) at the Motor City Roundball Classic.

Last year, Troy got the best of Ashland, winning at the buzzer as the Colts picked up a 43-41 win on a tip-in as time expired.

But this year, it was Ashland that came out on top as the Arrows buried 13 3-pointers to pick up a 70-55 win over Troy.

Tim Fralick said that coaching against his Dad and his former high school gives mixed emotions, but he enjoys the experience of the game and added that win or lose, both he and his Dad are able to move on pretty quick.

“It’s bittersweet,” he said. “It’s cool because not too many people can coach against their Dad. I have the utmost respect for him as a coach, obviously having played for him and he’s a great coach. It’s a fun thing to do while we’re still coaching, so we figured that we might as well do it and we feel bad for me or him if the other guy loses, but we move on pretty quickly and we don’t rub it in each other’s face too much. Just a little bit. But every other game out of the year, I root for Troy, I played there, played for him and he’s rooting hard for us.”

In the third quarter, Ashland led by as many as 17, 37-20, but Troy would rattle off 13 straight points as a part of a 15-1 run that eventually trimmed the deficit down to just three, 38-35 with under two minutes left to play in the third quarter after back-to-back baskets from Lamont Walters.

Gary Fralick noted that he was happy with his team’s ability to battle back throughout the entire night, and added that he’s had the opportunity to watch his son’s team continue to grow and improve and joked that while he was well aware of Ashland’s shooting ability, he had hoped it would have as much success from the outside as it did.

“We battled,” he said. “We made some plays down to Devin down low, I think Lamont made a couple of nice plays. We made a couple of nice runs on them, we battled back and that’s a good team that we played. I’ve seen that team grow up over the years and they pass the ball well, they know where there shooters are. We knew they shot the 3’s that well, we hoped they wouldn’t shoot that well today against us.”

But as was the case for much of the night, Ashland’s red-hot shooting from behind the arc proved to be too much for Troy as the Arrows closed out the third quarter on an 11-0 run, highlighted by eight straight points from Isaac White to give Ashland a 49-38 lead entering the fourth quarter as the Arrows would cruise to a 15 point win.

“We shoot a lot of them,” said Tim Fralick on his team’s effectiveness from the outside. “That’s what we want to do, shoot 3’s or get layups and get to the free throw line. That’s always been a goal for us and we know we’re going to go in spurts where we’re shooting that 3, but when there are some droughts, we know there are going to be a few possessions in a row where we’re going to knock them down.”

With the win, Ashland improves to 5-1 on the early season, while Troy drops to 2-2.

The idea of playing a game against one another came up after the Ohio high school basketball schedule expanded to 22 games according to Tim, and Gary added that it was a conversation that was sparked on the golf course and it’s a fun event for their entire family.

“I think we were out on the golf course and we had scrimmaged each other ever since he had been at Ashland,” he said. “I can’t remember who mentioned it, but we said wouldn’t it be nice to play in the regular season and he likes to come up here to Michigan and it works into his schedule because it’s Christmastime and he wants to be with us and he has his assistant coaches bring the kids up. It’s fun, and I’m not grinning ear-to-ear right now, but it’s fun for the Fralick family.”